Discussion:
Whats the name of this Genre? Homer Price, Henry Reed, Mad Scientists Club, ...
(too old to reply)
Mark Atwood
2007-01-12 04:52:24 UTC
Permalink
Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.

Does this genre have a name? What are some other books/series in this
genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or "ya".)

A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF, are the Danny
Dunn books.

--
Mark Atwood When you do things right, people won't be sure
***@mark.atwood.name you've done anything at all.
http://mark.atwood.name/ http://fallenpegasus.livejournal.com/
Mike Schilling
2007-01-12 05:35:13 UTC
Permalink
"Mark Atwood" <***@mark.atwood.name> wrote in message
news:***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com...
>
> Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
> Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.
>
> Does this genre have a name? What are some other books/series in this
> genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or "ya".)
>
> A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF, are the Danny
> Dunn books.

All fondly remembered, though Danny Dunn is a step towards the slippery
slope that leads to Tom Swift. Encyclopedia Brown is a juvenile version.
Freddy the detective is a fantasy entry. The closest I can come is to call
them sports books for kids whose prefer to exercise their minds.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2007-01-12 06:30:57 UTC
Permalink
In article <l6Fph.19572$***@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>,
Mike Schilling <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>"Mark Atwood" <***@mark.atwood.name> wrote in message
>news:***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com...
>>
>> Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
>> Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.
>>
>> Does this genre have a name? What are some other books/series in this
>> genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or "ya".)
>>
>> A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF, are the Danny
>> Dunn books.
>
>All fondly remembered, though Danny Dunn is a step towards the slippery
>slope that leads to Tom Swift. Encyclopedia Brown is a juvenile version.
>Freddy the detective is a fantasy entry. The closest I can come is to call
>them sports books for kids whose prefer to exercise their minds.
>
>

"Boys' Adventures"?

As for others, Rick Brant & The Hardy Boys come to mind.



Ted
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-12 17:15:56 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-11 21:35:13 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
<***@hotmail.com> said:

>
> "Mark Atwood" <***@mark.atwood.name> wrote in message
> news:***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com...
>>
>> Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
>> Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.
>>
>> Does this genre have a name? What are some other books/series in this
>> genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or "ya".)
>>
>> A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF, are the Danny
>> Dunn books.
>
> All fondly remembered, though Danny Dunn is a step towards the slippery
> slope that leads to Tom Swift. Encyclopedia Brown is a juvenile
> version. Freddy the detective is a fantasy entry. The closest I can
> come is to call them sports books for kids whose prefer to exercise
> their minds.

They're not all the same genre, aside from being kids' books. Danny
Dunn and Tom Swift are both juvenile SF. Encyclopedia Brown is
juvenile detective fiction. Henry Reed and Homer Price are humorous
stories about kids' experiences in small towns -- not coming-of-age
stories, but on the way to them. Light comic adventure, maybe, for
very mild values of the word "adventure." The Great Brain stories are
both light comic adventure and fictionalized historical memoir, since
they're period pieces based on the author's childhood experiences but
heavily fictionalized (they take place before he was actually born, for
instance). The Mad Scientists' Club is light comic adventure about
kids, stories that tend to focus on science.

Within the fact that most of 'em are light comic adventure, though, the
Henry Reed books are mostly about a kid running an entrepreneurial
business of one sort or another, the Homer Price books are simply
small-town tales of growing up, the Great Brain stories are period
pieces about sibling rivalry and (usually) con games, and the MSC are
kids doing science. But they all get classed, largely, as "children's
fiction," without much distinction between them.

Other series that fall into the same general category include Beverly
Cleary's books about Henry Huggins, Beezus Quimby, Ellen Tebbits, Otis
Spofford and others; Sydney Taylor's All-Of-A-Kind Family; Elizabeth
Enright's Melendy books, beginning with The Four-Story mistake, Mary
Nash's Mrs. Coverlet books and Mary Calhoun's Katie John.

Further afield, there's the Pippi Longstocking books, Edward Eager's
and E. Nesbit's kids' fantasy novels, the interminable numbers of Enid
Blyton kids' adventure books, Oliver Butterworth's novels (including
the immortal The Trouble With Jenny's Ear) and plenty more.

kdb
Kip Williams
2007-01-12 17:45:31 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:
> Other series that fall into the same general category include Beverly
> Cleary's books about Henry Huggins, Beezus Quimby, Ellen Tebbits, Otis
> Spofford and others; Sydney Taylor's All-Of-A-Kind Family; Elizabeth
> Enright's Melendy books, beginning with The Four-Story mistake, Mary
> Nash's Mrs. Coverlet books and Mary Calhoun's Katie John.

Ah! I would have include the Coverlet books in my list. They fit my idea
of the sort-of genre the post made me think of.

Beverly Cleary, not so much, but what a great writer. She adapted
several "Leave it to Beaver" episodes for paperbacks (as short-story
collections), and got even deeper into Beaver's head than the
screenwriters did.

I didn't know there were sequels to the Four-Story Mistake. I'll have to
look into that.

Kip W
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-12 17:59:18 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-12 09:45:31 -0800, Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:

> Kurt Busiek wrote:
>> Other series that fall into the same general category include Beverly
>> Cleary's books about Henry Huggins, Beezus Quimby, Ellen Tebbits, Otis
>> Spofford and others; Sydney Taylor's All-Of-A-Kind Family; Elizabeth
>> Enright's Melendy books, beginning with The Four-Story mistake, Mary
>> Nash's Mrs. Coverlet books and Mary Calhoun's Katie John.
>
> Ah! I would have include the Coverlet books in my list. They fit my
> idea of the sort-of genre the post made me think of.

I almost didn't include them because I remembered fantasy elements to
them -- or perhaps they were stuff the kids thought were magic, but
weren't.

But any book that gives you "Good King Wence's car backed out/On a
piece of Stephen" is well worth it, says I.

> Beverly Cleary, not so much, but what a great writer. She adapted
> several "Leave it to Beaver" episodes for paperbacks (as short-story
> collections), and got even deeper into Beaver's head than the
> screenwriters did.

I'd say the early Cleary books are very close in spirit to Homer Price
and Henry Reed -- some are just tales of growing up, some are tales of
kids starting a business, and so on.

> I didn't know there were sequels to the Four-Story Mistake. I'll have
> to look into that.

There must be at least three -- the series is often referred to as "the
Melendy Quartet."

Oh, and I forgot to list (in the slightly-farther-afield section) Jane
Lanngton's Concord-set kids' fantasies, starting with THE DIAMOND IN
THE WINDOW.

And then even farther afield, Joan Aiken's WOLVES OF WILLOUGHBY CHASE books...

kdb
Default User
2007-01-12 21:56:38 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:

> On 2007-01-12 09:45:31 -0800, Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:
>
> > Kurt Busiek wrote:
> > > Other series that fall into the same general category include
> > > Beverly Cleary's books about Henry Huggins, Beezus Quimby, Ellen
> > > Tebbits, Otis Spofford and others; Sydney Taylor's All-Of-A-Kind
> > > Family; Elizabeth Enright's Melendy books, beginning with The
> > > Four-Story mistake, Mary Nash's Mrs. Coverlet books and Mary
> > > Calhoun's Katie John.
> >
> > Ah! I would have include the Coverlet books in my list. They fit my
> > idea of the sort-of genre the post made me think of.
>
> I almost didn't include them because I remembered fantasy elements to
> them -- or perhaps they were stuff the kids thought were magic, but
> weren't.
>
> But any book that gives you "Good King Wence's car backed out/On a
> piece of Stephen" is well worth it, says I.

Hey, I remember that! It had something to do with cats didn't it?



Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-12 22:02:02 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-12 13:56:38 -0800, "Default User" <***@yahoo.com> said:

> Kurt Busiek wrote:
>
>> On 2007-01-12 09:45:31 -0800, Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:
>>
>>> Kurt Busiek wrote:
>>>> Other series that fall into the same general category include
>>>> Beverly Cleary's books about Henry Huggins, Beezus Quimby, Ellen
>>>> Tebbits, Otis Spofford and others; Sydney Taylor's All-Of-A-Kind
>>>> Family; Elizabeth Enright's Melendy books, beginning with The
>>>> Four-Story mistake, Mary Nash's Mrs. Coverlet books and Mary
>>>> Calhoun's Katie John.
>>>
>>> Ah! I would have include the Coverlet books in my list. They fit my
>>> idea of the sort-of genre the post made me think of.
>>
>> I almost didn't include them because I remembered fantasy elements to
>> them -- or perhaps they were stuff the kids thought were magic, but
>> weren't.
>>
>> But any book that gives you "Good King Wence's car backed out/On a
>> piece of Stephen" is well worth it, says I.
>
> Hey, I remember that! It had something to do with cats didn't it?

Not that I recall, though there might be cats in there somewhere.

There's a kid named Toad in those books, and he makes with the
malaprops. I haven't read any of the books in over 35 years, but I can
still instantly recall "20,000 Leaks Under the Sea," "Snow White and
the Seventh Divorce" and of course, good King Wence, his car, and the
unfortunate Stephen.

kdb
Kip Williams
2007-01-12 22:28:28 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:
> On 2007-01-12 13:56:38 -0800, "Default User" <***@yahoo.com>
> said:
>
>> Hey, I remember that! It had something to do with cats didn't it?
>
> Not that I recall, though there might be cats in there somewhere.
>
> There's a kid named Toad in those books, and he makes with the
> malaprops. I haven't read any of the books in over 35 years, but I can
> still instantly recall "20,000 Leaks Under the Sea," "Snow White and the
> Seventh Divorce" and of course, good King Wence, his car, and the
> unfortunate Stephen.

It was good King Wences' car (as in Senor Wences). I just checked to be
sure I was remembering it right.

In the "Mrs. Coverlet" stories, the Persevers' youngest, "The Toad," has
a family of cats. In "Mrs. Coverlet's Magicians," the McGuffin of the
plot is a recipe the Toad concocted for kitty treats that are well-nigh
miraculous in their effect on people (and also Mrs. Coverlet's severe
stand-in is mysteriously bedridden and cheerful). In one of the others,
one of the cats is catnapped... I think it's the third one, "Mrs.
Coverlet's Detectives." The cats feature in all three books, in one way
or another.

"Dig the holes with trowels, by golly!"

Kip W
Default User
2007-01-12 23:14:01 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:

> Kurt Busiek wrote:
> >On 2007-01-12 13:56:38 -0800, "Default User"
> <***@yahoo.com> said:
> >
> > > Hey, I remember that! It had something to do with cats didn't it?
> >
> > Not that I recall, though there might be cats in there somewhere.
> >
> > There's a kid named Toad in those books, and he makes with the
> > malaprops. I haven't read any of the books in over 35 years, but I
> > can still instantly recall "20,000 Leaks Under the Sea," "Snow
> > White and the Seventh Divorce" and of course, good King Wence, his
> > car, and the unfortunate Stephen.
>
> It was good King Wences' car (as in Senor Wences). I just checked to
> be sure I was remembering it right.
>
> In the "Mrs. Coverlet" stories, the Persevers' youngest, "The Toad,"
> has a family of cats. In "Mrs. Coverlet's Magicians," the McGuffin of
> the plot is a recipe the Toad concocted for kitty treats that are
> well-nigh miraculous in their effect on people (and also Mrs.
> Coverlet's severe stand-in is mysteriously bedridden and cheerful).
> In one of the others, one of the cats is catnapped... I think it's
> the third one, "Mrs. Coverlet's Detectives." The cats feature in all
> three books, in one way or another.

Yeah, yeah. The one I read had something to do with rare type of male
tortoiseshell cat or something.



Brian


--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
Kip Williams
2007-01-13 00:10:09 UTC
Permalink
Default User wrote:
> Yeah, yeah. The one I read had something to do with rare type of male
> tortoiseshell cat or something.
>
Does the headline "NERVOUS NABBED" ring a bell?

Kip W
Default User
2007-01-13 01:06:32 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:

> Default User wrote:
> > Yeah, yeah. The one I read had something to do with rare type of
> > male tortoiseshell cat or something.
> >
> Does the headline "NERVOUS NABBED" ring a bell?

Not specifically.


Brian
--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
Kip Williams
2007-01-13 03:06:51 UTC
Permalink
Default User wrote:
> Kip Williams wrote:
>
>>Default User wrote:
>>
>>>Yeah, yeah. The one I read had something to do with rare type of
>>>male tortoiseshell cat or something.
>>
>>Does the headline "NERVOUS NABBED" ring a bell?
>
> Not specifically.

It was an illustration from the book. Nervous was the name of the cat.

Kip W
Default User
2007-01-13 05:55:34 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:

> Default User wrote:
> > Kip Williams wrote:
> >
> > > Default User wrote:
> > >
> > > > Yeah, yeah. The one I read had something to do with rare type of
> > > > male tortoiseshell cat or something.
> > >
> > > Does the headline "NERVOUS NABBED" ring a bell?
> >
> > Not specifically.
>
> It was an illustration from the book. Nervous was the name of the cat.

Not the one I read, apparently. See my other message.



Brian
--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
Default User
2007-01-13 01:25:43 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:

> Default User wrote:
> > Yeah, yeah. The one I read had something to do with rare type of
> > male tortoiseshell cat or something.
> >
> Does the headline "NERVOUS NABBED" ring a bell?

From checking online, it looks like the one I read was "Mrs. Coverlet's
Magicians", because I remember the bread pudding recipe. As I recall,
The Toad was the original owner of the cat. I gather the headline above
is from "Detectives" where that cat disappears.




Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
David Goldfarb
2007-01-13 01:05:24 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@mid.individual.net>,
Default User <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>The one I read had something to do with rare type of male
>tortoiseshell cat or something.

Any male tortoiseshell is rare -- color genes are sex-linked,
so the only way a tom can be mixed black and orange is if
its sex chromosomes are XXY due to maternal chromosome
nondisjunction.

--
David Goldfarb |"In the fifties, people responded well to
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | authoritative disembodied voices."
***@csua.berkeley.edu | -- MST3K
Petrea Mitchell
2007-01-13 18:08:16 UTC
Permalink
In rec.arts.sf.fandom David Goldfarb <***@ocf.berkeley.edu> wrote:

> Any male tortoiseshell is rare -- color genes are sex-linked,
> so the only way a tom can be mixed black and orange is if
> its sex chromosomes are XXY due to maternal chromosome
> nondisjunction.

IIRC, 1 in 10,000 calicos or tortoiseshells will be male.


--
/
Petrea Mitchell <|> <|> <***@m5p.com> <***@osm.com>
"Why must policemen always go in pairs, like low comedians?" ---"Mystery!"
"Hit him again, the foley guy's getting bored." ---Zorak (S. Spencer Sun)
mike weber
2007-01-14 01:56:25 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 13 Jan 2007 18:08:16 -0000, Petrea Mitchell
<***@parkstreet.m5p.com> wrote:

>In rec.arts.sf.fandom David Goldfarb <***@ocf.berkeley.edu> wrote:
>
>> Any male tortoiseshell is rare -- color genes are sex-linked,
>> so the only way a tom can be mixed black and orange is if
>> its sex chromosomes are XXY due to maternal chromosome
>> nondisjunction.
>
>IIRC, 1 in 10,000 calicos or tortoiseshells will be male.

And *probably* sterile.

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Eric D. Berge
2007-01-16 16:37:52 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 14:02:02 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@aol.com>
wrote:

>There's a kid named Toad in those books, and he makes with the
>malaprops. I haven't read any of the books in over 35 years, but I can
>still instantly recall "20,000 Leaks Under the Sea," "Snow White and
>the Seventh Divorce" and of course, good King Wence, his car, and the
>unfortunate Stephen.

Heh, clever mondegreen.

Actually, the song goes as follows:

Good King Whens the Last looked out
On his feets uneven
Where the mice lay 'round about,
His Christmas dinner thievin'.
mike weber
2007-01-16 18:14:25 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 16:37:52 GMT, Eric D. Berge <eric_berge @
hotmail.com.invalid> wrote:

>On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 14:02:02 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@aol.com>
>wrote:
>
>>There's a kid named Toad in those books, and he makes with the
>>malaprops. I haven't read any of the books in over 35 years, but I can
>>still instantly recall "20,000 Leaks Under the Sea," "Snow White and
>>the Seventh Divorce" and of course, good King Wence, his car, and the
>>unfortunate Stephen.
>
>Heh, clever mondegreen.
>
>Actually, the song goes as follows:
>
>Good King Whens the Last looked out
>On his feets uneven
>Where the mice lay 'round about,
>His Christmas dinner thievin'.

"Good King Sauerkraut look out!
On your feets uneven
While the snoo lays round about..."

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-16 18:27:59 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-16 10:14:25 -0800, mike weber <***@gmail.com> said:

> On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 16:37:52 GMT, Eric D. Berge <eric_berge @
> hotmail.com.invalid> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 14:02:02 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@aol.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> There's a kid named Toad in those books, and he makes with the
>>> malaprops. I haven't read any of the books in over 35 years, but I can
>>> still instantly recall "20,000 Leaks Under the Sea," "Snow White and
>>> the Seventh Divorce" and of course, good King Wence, his car, and the
>>> unfortunate Stephen.
>>
>> Heh, clever mondegreen.
>>
>> Actually, the song goes as follows:
>>
>> Good King Whens the Last looked out
>> On his feets uneven
>> Where the mice lay 'round about,
>> His Christmas dinner thievin'.
>
> "Good King Sauerkraut look out!
> On your feets uneven
> While the snoo lays round about..."

"Snoo? What's snoo?"

the straight man
mike weber
2007-01-16 23:00:27 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 10:27:59 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics>
wrote:

>On 2007-01-16 10:14:25 -0800, mike weber <***@gmail.com> said:
>

>> "Good King Sauerkraut look out!
>> On your feets uneven
>> While the snoo lays round about..."
>
>"Snoo? What's snoo?"
>
>the straight man

A*Hem.... *koff* *koff*

{broadly purple declamatory mode}

"Oh, I don't know. What's snoo with you?"

{/broadly purple declamatory mode}

Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
henway for that one...

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
David Goldfarb
2007-01-16 23:03:41 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>,
mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>henway for that one...

<straightman>
What's a henway?
</straightman>

--
David Goldfarb |"Ah, Amerikanski humor. Is most funny.
***@ocf.berkeley.edu |
***@csua.berkeley.edu |
| We bomb now." -- J. Michael Straczynski
Derek Tattersall
2007-01-16 23:22:25 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-16, David Goldfarb <***@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
> In article <***@4ax.com>,
> mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>>henway for that one...
>
><straightman>
> What's a henway?
></straightman>
>

About the same as a Greek Urn.

--
Derek Tattersall
Bill Snyder
2007-01-17 01:11:51 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 18:22:25 -0500, Derek Tattersall
<***@newsguy.com> wrote:

>On 2007-01-16, David Goldfarb <***@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
>> In article <***@4ax.com>,
>> mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>>>henway for that one...
>>
>><straightman>
>> What's a henway?
>></straightman>
>>
>
>About the same as a Greek Urn.

Greek tailor: Euripides?
Customer: Yes. Eumenides?

Thank you. Thank you. I'll be here all week.

--
Bill Snyder [This space unintentionally left blank.]
Derek Tattersall
2007-01-17 02:05:23 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-17, Bill Snyder <***@airmail.net> wrote:
> On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 18:22:25 -0500, Derek Tattersall
><***@newsguy.com> wrote:
>
>>On 2007-01-16, David Goldfarb <***@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
>>> In article <***@4ax.com>,
>>> mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>>>>henway for that one...
>>>
>>><straightman>
>>> What's a henway?
>>></straightman>
>>>
>>
>>About the same as a Greek Urn.
>
> Greek tailor: Euripides?
> Customer: Yes. Eumenides?
>
> Thank you. Thank you. I'll be here all week.
>

That's good. They'll be ready Thursday.

--
Derek Tattersall
Mike Schilling
2007-01-17 06:12:51 UTC
Permalink
"Bill Snyder" <***@airmail.net> wrote in message
news:***@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 18:22:25 -0500, Derek Tattersall
> <***@newsguy.com> wrote:
>
>>On 2007-01-16, David Goldfarb <***@OCF.Berkeley.EDU> wrote:
>>> In article <***@4ax.com>,
>>> mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>>>>henway for that one...
>>>
>>><straightman>
>>> What's a henway?
>>></straightman>
>>>
>>
>>About the same as a Greek Urn.
>
> Greek tailor: Euripides?
> Customer: Yes. Eumenides?

I just saw a pycost.
Sea Wasp
2007-01-17 00:33:34 UTC
Permalink
David Goldfarb wrote:
> In article <***@4ax.com>,
> mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>>henway for that one...
>
>
> <straightman>
> What's a henway?
> </straightman>
>

Oh, 'bout six pounds. *rimshot*

--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Live Journal: http://www.livejournal.com/users/seawasp/
mike weber
2007-01-17 02:22:51 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 23:03:41 +0000 (UTC), ***@OCF.Berkeley.EDU
(David Goldfarb) wrote:

>In article <***@4ax.com>,
>mike weber <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>Good jokes are incredibly dear these days. Why i had to trade a
>>henway for that one...
>
><straightman>
>What's a henway?
></straightman>

A remark handed down from ages immemorial as infallibly
gravity-removing.

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Elaine Thompson
2007-01-13 05:17:46 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 09:59:18 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@aol.com>
wrote:


...



>> I didn't know there were sequels to the Four-Story Mistake. I'll have
>> to look into that.
>
>There must be at least three -- the series is often referred to as "the
>Melendy Quartet."


/unlurk/

The set starts with _The Saturdays_ which is set in NY. Then they
move to the country in _the Four Story Mistake_. Adventures in the
country and meeting Mark, and deciding to adopt him are in _Then There
Were Five_, the last is _Spiderweb for Two_, which focuses on the two
youngest, Randy and Oliver who keep finding mysterious clues which
keep them busy during a fall/winter/spring while the older kids are
all away at school.

All still in print, AFAIK. I picked them up a few years back for our
daughter and still see them in local bookstores.

And the Homer Price books still read very enjoyably to this adult's
eyes, and to children's.



--
Elaine Thompson <***@KEThompson.org>
William December Starr
2007-02-04 16:09:32 UTC
Permalink
In article <200701120959188930-***@aolcom>,
Kurt Busiek <***@aol.com> said:

> On 2007-01-12 09:45:31 -0800, Kip Williams <***@comcast.net>
> said:
>
>> I didn't know there were sequels to the Four-Story Mistake. I'll
>> have to look into that.
>
> There must be at least three -- the series is often referred to as
> "the Melendy Quartet."

Four, total, and they don't start with THE FOUR STORY MISTAKE:

1) THE SATURDAYS (1941)
2) THE FOUR-STORY MISTAKE (1942)
3) THEN THERE WERE FIVE (1944)
4) SPIDERWEB FOR TWO (1951)

As you can see, SPIDERWEB wasn't written at the same time as the
original three; I tend to think of the books as a set of three plus
a later follow-up. The "Two" in the title are Randy (Miranda) and
Oliver, the two youngest children and, at the time of the book, the
only ones still at home while their older siblings are at college.

The first three were staples of my childhood so I can't be unbiased
about them. I recommend them incredibly highly.

--
William December Starr <***@panix.com>
Kip Williams
2007-02-04 16:14:02 UTC
Permalink
William December Starr wrote:
> Four, total, and they don't start with THE FOUR STORY MISTAKE:
>
> 1) THE SATURDAYS (1941)
> 2) THE FOUR-STORY MISTAKE (1942)
> 3) THEN THERE WERE FIVE (1944)
> 4) SPIDERWEB FOR TWO (1951)
>
> As you can see, SPIDERWEB wasn't written at the same time as the
> original three; I tend to think of the books as a set of three plus
> a later follow-up. The "Two" in the title are Randy (Miranda) and
> Oliver, the two youngest children and, at the time of the book, the
> only ones still at home while their older siblings are at college.
>
> The first three were staples of my childhood so I can't be unbiased
> about them. I recommend them incredibly highly.

Thanks; I'll keep an eye out for them. I wonder if libraries have things
like that these days, or if it's all series fiction from the last couple
of years now.

Kip W
Peter Meilinger
2007-02-04 20:25:14 UTC
Permalink
On Feb 4, 8:14 am, Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote:
> William December Starr wrote:
> > Four, total, and they don't start with THE FOUR STORY MISTAKE:
>
> > 1) THE SATURDAYS (1941)
> > 2) THE FOUR-STORY MISTAKE (1942)
> > 3) THEN THERE WERE FIVE (1944)
> > 4) SPIDERWEB FOR TWO (1951)

Snip

> Thanks; I'll keep an eye out for them. I wonder if libraries have things
> like that these days, or if it's all series fiction from the last couple
> of years now.

Well, the library system I work in has all of them, anyway. I don't
think I can get WorldCat over the web, so I'm not sure who else has
them, but we are not by any stretch of the imagination phenomenally
well stocked compared to most libraries out there. Check your
local libraries. I'd be amazed if they don't have at least a few of
them. Part of the problem, of course, is that library books don't
necessarily have a long and healthy existence, and if we're talking
about out of print books that people enjoy reading, they probably
disintegrated a long time ago despite the best efforts of the mad
scientists in the back room to keep them going for one more year.

My library does have a LOT of children's series, because a LOT of
kids like reading that stuff, but it's not all from the past few
years.
I'd say the past twenty years or so, though many of our copies are
recent reprints of older books such as the Choose Your Own
Adventure stuff.

The older series, such as the books above, tend to be shelved
in the general fiction section. Partially I'd guess that's because
that's where they were before they created a specific section
for series, and partially because series of books by the same
author still tend to be put into the general fiction category. The
series stuff is mostly the books that have a lot of authors writing
under a house name, but not always. I have no idea what the
criteria are, and I'm not sure the cataloguers do, either.

Pete
Marilee J. Layman
2007-02-04 22:41:34 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Feb 2007 12:25:14 -0800, "Peter Meilinger"
<***@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On Feb 4, 8:14 am, Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote:
>> William December Starr wrote:
>> > Four, total, and they don't start with THE FOUR STORY MISTAKE:
>>
>> > 1) THE SATURDAYS (1941)
>> > 2) THE FOUR-STORY MISTAKE (1942)
>> > 3) THEN THERE WERE FIVE (1944)
>> > 4) SPIDERWEB FOR TWO (1951)
>
>Snip
>
>> Thanks; I'll keep an eye out for them. I wonder if libraries have things
>> like that these days, or if it's all series fiction from the last couple
>> of years now.
>
>Well, the library system I work in has all of them, anyway.

Our system is missing 3) but has the other three.
--
Marilee J. Layman
http://mjlayman.livejournal.com/
Mike Schilling
2007-01-12 19:00:12 UTC
Permalink
"Kip Williams" <***@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:***@comcast.com...
> Beverly Cleary, not so much, but what a great writer. She adapted several
> "Leave it to Beaver" episodes for paperbacks (as short-story collections),
> and got even deeper into Beaver's head than the screenwriters did.

Beverly Cleary write about Beaver Cleaver? That's even better than hiding
messages in pi.
Kip Williams
2007-01-12 19:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Mike Schilling wrote:
> "Kip Williams" <***@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:***@comcast.com...
>
>>Beverly Cleary, not so much, but what a great writer. She adapted several
>>"Leave it to Beaver" episodes for paperbacks (as short-story collections),
>>and got even deeper into Beaver's head than the screenwriters did.
>
> Beverly Cleary write about Beaver Cleaver? That's even better than hiding
> messages in pi.

When she writes about him sending away for an accordion (10 days free!),
he drags it upstairs first, because he has the idea he'll come walking
down the stairs playing it, and everybody'll be impressed.

Kip W
seanc
2007-01-12 06:13:03 UTC
Permalink
Mark Atwood wrote:
> Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
> Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.
>
> Does this genre have a name? What are some other books/series in this
> genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or "ya".)
>
> A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF, are the Danny
> Dunn books.

Anybody read _Henry 3_ by Joseph Krumgold? Almost but doesn't quite
fit onto your list. Certainly about a smart kid, plus there's a
section that foreshadows role playing games (written in 1971; my
knowledge of RPG history isn't extensive -- maybe it's not really as
prescient as i thought when i first read it).

Sean
Paul Dormer
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com>,
***@mark.atwood.name (Mark Atwood) wrote:

> Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books
> about Homer Price,
> Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.
>
> Does this genre have a name? What are some other
> books/series in this
> genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or
> "ya".)
>
> A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF,
> are the Danny
> Dunn books.

The only name I recognise on this list is Danny Dunn - they were
available in my children's library in the north of England in the early
sixties.

Which reminds me of another series, called There's Adventure in...,
with the ellipsis being filled by things like "chemistry", "geology" and
"meteorology". These were adventure stories about a couple of
brothers learning about various sciences. (The books were shelved in
the non-fiction section of the library.) For instance, learning about
meteorology, they stow away on a plane that is flying through a
hurricane and get marooned on an island with their father and a
meteorologist who improvises some meteorological instruments to
determine where the nearest land mass is. The one on chemistry
starts with them going spelunking (a term almost unknown in the UK)
and getting a rust stain on a shirt. I still remember from that that
you don't use bleach on rust stains, as bleaches are oxidising and you
need a reducing agent, such as citric acid.

Googling on the titles shows the books were written by Julian May,
and the Wikipedia article for the SF author of that name says that
she wrote non-fiction books for children in the fifties.
Kip Williams
2007-01-12 14:07:32 UTC
Permalink
Paul Dormer wrote:
> In article <***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com>,
> ***@mark.atwood.name (Mark Atwood) wrote:
>
>>Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books
>>about Homer Price,
>>Henry Reed, the Mad Scientists Club, the Great Brain.
>>
>>Does this genre have a name? What are some other
>>books/series in this
>>genre? (And I mean more specific then just "juvi" or
>>"ya".)
>>
>>A similar series that is both in that genre, and in SF,
>>are the Danny
>>Dunn books.
>
> The only name I recognise on this list is Danny Dunn - they were
> available in my children's library in the north of England in the early
> sixties.

I don't recognize the Great Brain offhand, but the other three there are
huge favorites of mine. I read one or two Danny Dunns, and they weren't
bad, but they didn't move me to finish the series.

Henry Reed wrote in the first person, and his accounts of summer
vacations and road trips were worth re-reading and still get space on my
shelves. The illustrations by Robert McCloskey added to the enjoyment.
He was inquisitive and inventive, and his friend Midge's initiative got
them into amusing situations.

McCloskey wrote and illustrated Homer Price, a classic series of a quiet
boyhood in a quiet town where sometimes bizarre events unfolded, like a
giant ragweed or an unstoppable mania for singing an all-too-catchy
song. Memorable as the big episodes were, the smaller ones got right to
the heart of small-town life. Centerburg, the location of the stories,
has a pageant to commemorate the history of the town, which had
originally been called Edible Fungus in honor of a fortuitous find that
saved the lives of the first settlers. So, on anniversary occasions, a
choir would sing a song written by a music teacher:

"Forty pounds of edible fungus
In the wilderness a-growin'..."

The Mad Scientists Club was even more edgy, with its cast of boy
geniuses contrasted with the staid and unimaginative town authorities.
Their conversations sound rather similar to fan chat, and their schemes
(including hatching a dinosaur egg, which seems to have been turned into
a major motion picture, with or without credit to the books) are real
page turners. They were originally presented as short stories in _Boy's
Life_. It's worth searching them online, because the author actually
wrote a novel about the group that wasn't published until recently, and
it's available through a web page supervised by, I believe, his son.
(Note to self: Order the book!) I'm thinking it was "about to come out"
last time I looked, and that was a while ago.

I'll say it again: A *new* Mad Scientists Club novel!

All of these are still in my bookshelf, lovingly read and enjoyed. Homer
Price came out in an omnibus edition at Barnes and Noble a while back,
and I got all the stories in a cardboard cover along with some stories
of Homer's Grampa Hercules. Best of all, the illustrations look much
better than they do in my oft-reprinted Arrow Books editions from grade
school. They look more like the original I saw at the Chrysler Museum's
exhibition of children's book art a few years ack.

Though these were big favorites of mine, I don't know if they're all in
the same genre. Henry Reed is more a slice of life without fantastic
elements. The Mad Scientists are mostly grounded in reality with an
engineering sensibility (Brinley was a rocket scientist). Danny Dunn was
more of a fantasy, and Homer Price occasionally dabbled in the
fantastic. If anything, they're something like training wheels for an
eventual enjoyment of SF and/or fantasy.

I'm not sure what else I'd put in a similar class. Freddy the Pig was an
introduction to elements of SF, fantasy (talking animals!), poetry,
detection, and others. The books of Edward Eager are fantasy that happen
to children who are quick to try and figure things out and whose
conversations are a lot of the fun. Joan Aiken's alternate histories
were real mind openers (I didn't like it as much when the series turned
toward fantasy, but I was also older then).

I liked a Professor Branestawm story, "The Screaming Clocks," which was
in an anthology we got from Grandma. I used to enthuse over it to Gordon
Garb, and he managed to dig up a whole collection of Branestawm tales.
It turned out that the one I'd read first was his best, but I'd give it
another whack now and see if things seem any different.

Seems like there are more series like these than ever these days, though
far more in the fantasy realm than sf or techie. Maybe there's an
opening there.

Kip W
Kip Williams
2007-01-12 14:34:39 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:
> "Forty pounds of edible fungus
> In the wilderness a-growin'..."

I just looked; it was forty-two. I blush in shame.

Kip W
Cally Soukup
2007-01-17 22:13:22 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote in article <***@comcast.com>:
> Kip Williams wrote:
> > "Forty pounds of edible fungus
> > In the wilderness a-growin'..."

> I just looked; it was forty-two. I blush in shame.

I'm just thrilled I finally have a name for the series with Edible
Fungus in it. Homer Price. Gotta remember that.

Was there an episode in one of those books where a carbon-copy
subdivision got put up, and the street signs weren't yet, and people
navigated by where they were in relation to the big old manor house
that hadn't been torn down yet? Until it was, but the day was saved
because the town drunk was discovered over the remains of the wine
cellar, so they navigated by where they were in relation to him?

--
"I disapprove of what you have to say, but I will defend to the death
your right to say it." -- Beatrice Hall

Cally Soukup ***@two14.net
Kip Williams
2007-01-18 00:08:25 UTC
Permalink
Cally Soukup wrote:
> I'm just thrilled I finally have a name for the series with Edible
> Fungus in it. Homer Price. Gotta remember that.
>
> Was there an episode in one of those books where a carbon-copy
> subdivision got put up, and the street signs weren't yet, and people
> navigated by where they were in relation to the big old manor house
> that hadn't been torn down yet? Until it was, but the day was saved
> because the town drunk was discovered over the remains of the wine
> cellar, so they navigated by where they were in relation to him?

Yes. Another memorable episode. Great series.

Kip W
Nancy Lebovitz
2007-01-19 17:06:11 UTC
Permalink
In article <ee-***@comcast.com>,
Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote:
>Cally Soukup wrote:
>> I'm just thrilled I finally have a name for the series with Edible
>> Fungus in it. Homer Price. Gotta remember that.
>>
>> Was there an episode in one of those books where a carbon-copy
>> subdivision got put up, and the street signs weren't yet, and people
>> navigated by where they were in relation to the big old manor house
>> that hadn't been torn down yet? Until it was, but the day was saved
>> because the town drunk was discovered over the remains of the wine
>> cellar, so they navigated by where they were in relation to him?
>
>Yes. Another memorable episode. Great series.

The one I remember was about Ever So Much More So.
--
Nancy Lebovitz http://www.nancybuttons.com

http://nancylebov.livejournal.com
My two favorite colors are "Oooooh" and "SHINY!".
mike weber
2007-01-19 22:29:33 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 17:06:11 +0000 (UTC), ***@panix.com (Nancy
Lebovitz) wrote:

>In article <ee-***@comcast.com>,
>Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote:
>>Cally Soukup wrote:
>>> I'm just thrilled I finally have a name for the series with Edible
>>> Fungus in it. Homer Price. Gotta remember that.
>>>
>>> Was there an episode in one of those books where a carbon-copy
>>> subdivision got put up, and the street signs weren't yet, and people
>>> navigated by where they were in relation to the big old manor house
>>> that hadn't been torn down yet? Until it was, but the day was saved
>>> because the town drunk was discovered over the remains of the wine
>>> cellar, so they navigated by where they were in relation to him?
>>
>>Yes. Another memorable episode. Great series.
>
>The one I remember was about Ever So Much More So.

My favourite Homer Price story has the punchline "=The air was filled
with 'that bracing, invigorating odor that keeps you on your toes' ...
but mostly the air was filled with Aroma...="

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Marilee J. Layman
2007-01-19 01:49:28 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 22:13:22 +0000 (UTC), Cally Soukup
<***@pobox.com> wrote:

>Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote in article <***@comcast.com>:
>> Kip Williams wrote:
>> > "Forty pounds of edible fungus
>> > In the wilderness a-growin'..."
>
>> I just looked; it was forty-two. I blush in shame.
>
>I'm just thrilled I finally have a name for the series with Edible
>Fungus in it. Homer Price. Gotta remember that.

What's weird to me is I remember the one with the donut machine, but I
don't remember anything about Homer Price. Was it a story in that
system where there were a batch of cards and you read the story and
answered the questions?

>Was there an episode in one of those books where a carbon-copy
>subdivision got put up, and the street signs weren't yet, and people
>navigated by where they were in relation to the big old manor house
>that hadn't been torn down yet? Until it was, but the day was saved
>because the town drunk was discovered over the remains of the wine
>cellar, so they navigated by where they were in relation to him?
--
Marilee J. Layman
http://mjlayman.livejournal.com/
Kip Williams
2007-01-19 03:13:58 UTC
Permalink
Marilee J. Layman wrote:
> On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 22:13:22 +0000 (UTC), Cally Soukup
> <***@pobox.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote in article <***@comcast.com>:
>>
>>>Kip Williams wrote:
>>>
>>>>"Forty pounds of edible fungus
>>>> In the wilderness a-growin'..."
>>
>>>I just looked; it was forty-two. I blush in shame.
>>
>>I'm just thrilled I finally have a name for the series with Edible
>>Fungus in it. Homer Price. Gotta remember that.
>
>
> What's weird to me is I remember the one with the donut machine, but I
> don't remember anything about Homer Price. Was it a story in that
> system where there were a batch of cards and you read the story and
> answered the questions?

SRA cards? God, I hated those. Well, the math ones anyway. You'd do one,
and there would still be 999 waiting after it. Killed all desire to even
do the one for me. I think I actually got an F in math for the quarter
when the teacher stuck us with those -- 7th grade. Then from 8th grade
until I encountered calculus in college, it was all As.

The text ones were on a shelf in my sixth grade classroom. I don't
remember if we got graded on them or not. I seem to recall simply going
through them and reading the stories.

Kip W
Paul Dormer
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@comcast.com>,
***@comcast.net (Kip Williams) wrote:

> The books of Edward Eager are fantasy that happen
> to children who are quick to try and figure things out
> and whose conversations are a lot of the fun.

Edward Eager was one of my favourites in the sixties, and I was able
to buy copies of the seven books he seems to be best known for on a
visit to the US about 20 years ago. (They were republished in the UK
a few years ago.) They are actually still fun to read. Also, I now can
see how influenced by E. Nesbit he was.

> Joan
> Aiken's alternate histories were real mind openers (I
> didn't like it as much when the series turned toward
> fantasy, but I was also older then).

I always feel I ought to enjoy Aiken's stuff more than I do, but I didn't
try reading her until will into adulthood.
Kip Williams
2007-01-12 14:52:00 UTC
Permalink
Paul Dormer wrote:
> In article <***@comcast.com>,
> ***@comcast.net (Kip Williams) wrote:
>
>>The books of Edward Eager are fantasy that happen
>>to children who are quick to try and figure things out
>>and whose conversations are a lot of the fun.
>
> Edward Eager was one of my favourites in the sixties, and I was able
> to buy copies of the seven books he seems to be best known for on a
> visit to the US about 20 years ago. (They were republished in the UK
> a few years ago.) They are actually still fun to read. Also, I now can
> see how influenced by E. Nesbit he was.

After having read two of them in my youth (multiple times), I sought out
and bought the rest. I still enjoy the first two the most, but it was
swell to read more by him. Then I finished the last one and felt sad,
because there was no more.

>>Joan
>>Aiken's alternate histories were real mind openers (I
>>didn't like it as much when the series turned toward
>>fantasy, but I was also older then).
>
> I always feel I ought to enjoy Aiken's stuff more than I do, but I didn't
> try reading her until will into adulthood.

My favorite is _Black Hearts Over Battersea_, the second in the series.
The first and third are also good.

Kip W
Paul Dormer
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@comcast.com>,
***@comcast.net (Kip Williams) wrote:

> My favorite is _Black Hearts Over Battersea_, the
> second in the series. The first and third are also
> good.

The BBC did a TV version of this about ten years ago.
Wim Lewis
2007-01-13 21:20:06 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@comcast.com>,
Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> wrote:
>I'll say it again: A *new* Mad Scientists Club novel!

I had to go look that up. "The Big Chunk of Ice" is out and available,
according to the websites of the series and the publisher (Purple House
Press):
http://www.madscientistsclub.com/books.html
http://www.purplehousepress.com/msc.htm


--
Wim Lewis <***@hhhh.org>, Seattle, WA, USA. PGP keyID 27F772C1
Keith F. Lynch
2007-01-13 18:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Paul Dormer <***@pauldormer.cix.co.uk> wrote:
> Which reminds me of another series, called There's Adventure in...,
> with the ellipsis being filled by things like "chemistry", "geology"
> and "meteorology".

> Googling on the titles shows the books were written by Julian May,
> and the Wikipedia article for the SF author of that name says that
> she wrote non-fiction books for children in the fifties.

ObFandon: She also chaired the 1952 Worldcon.
--
Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.
TimeTraveller
2007-01-13 20:54:58 UTC
Permalink
Way back in 1983 an attempt was made to launch a series of juvenile
science fiction books aimed at girls, with Jenny Dean, The Mystery of
the Shining Children. I've actually got that book in one of my boxes
around here...somewhere...

Doing a search at Amazon, doesn't look like there were any more books
in the series.

What about Mike Mars? Written during the 1960s at the same time as the
Mercury program. 3rd book in the series really made me grit my teeth in
its portrayal of a young woman who can fly planes and is very
knowledgeable about science (thanks to her dad being a wealthy
scientist), but who is ignored by Mr. Mars and co. strictly because
she's a girl, who 'chatters,' and maunders on, ad nauseum. If Donald
Wolheim were alive today, I'd kick him. [Only joking. But it does
grate. Especially since the Mercury 13 were also undergoing tests at
the same time as the men, and passing them with flying colors...]

And let us not forget Tom Corbett!


Caroline
The Thunder Child
http://thethunderchild.com
Michael Stemper
2007-01-12 22:31:38 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com>, Mark Atwood writes:

>Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,

I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?

If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?

--
Michael F. Stemper
#include <Standard_Disclaimer>
"Writing about jazz is like dancing about architecture" - Thelonious Monk
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2007-01-12 22:35:25 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@walkabout.empros.com>,
Michael Stemper <***@siemens-emis.com> wrote:
>
>
>I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
>Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
>such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
>Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?
>
>If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>
>--
>Michael F. Stemper

One certainly did involve a wonderous doughnut machine..

Juvpu onxrq n cnffvat-guebhtu evpu ynql'f evat vagb n qbhtuahg

Ted
Michael Stemper
2007-01-12 22:55:25 UTC
Permalink
In article <N2Uph.1277$***@bignews3.bellsouth.net>, Ted Nolan writes:
>In article <***@walkabout.empros.com>, Michael Stemper <***@siemens-emis.com> wrote:

>>I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
>>Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
>>such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
>>Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?

>One certainly did involve a wonderous doughnut machine..
>
> Juvpu onxrq n cnffvat-guebhtu evpu ynql'f evat vagb n qbhtuahg

Yes!!! It is the series that I was thinking of. Once again, the group
mind of rasw shows its prowess.

So anyway, how's their readability for an adult reader?

--
Michael F. Stemper
#include <Standard_Disclaimer>
This email is to be read by its intended recipient only. Any other party
reading is required by the EULA to send me $500.00.
Mark Atwood
2007-01-12 23:04:54 UTC
Permalink
***@siemens-emis.com (Michael Stemper) writes:
> In article <***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com>, Mark Atwood writes:
>
> >Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
>
> I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
> Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
> such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
> Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?

Yes it did, and yes it did.


--
Mark Atwood When you do things right, people won't be sure
***@mark.atwood.name you've done anything at all.
http://mark.atwood.name/ http://fallenpegasus.livejournal.com/
Kip Williams
2007-01-13 00:09:04 UTC
Permalink
Michael Stemper wrote:
> I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
> Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
> such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
> Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?

It was the sheriff. (Doughnut machine query answered elsewhere already.)

> If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?

They are still amusing and full of clever details.

Kip W
Kevrob
2007-01-13 02:31:27 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:
> Michael Stemper wrote:
> > I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
> > Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
> > such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
> > Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?
>
> It was the sheriff. (Doughnut machine query answered elsewhere already.)
>
> > If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>
> They are still amusing and full of clever details.
>
>

I read the "Homer Prices" as a kid, but I've long had McCloskey under
investigation for "crimes against sensawunda." See the second story in
"Homer Price," where a Kirk Alyn/George Reeves-manque visits
Centerburg. The whole "sensible boys and girls don't enjoy silly
stories about strange visitors from another planet" bit left a bad
impression on this fanboy. Kurt should Tuckerize her in a Superman
story, and inflict something suitably vile on her.

Kevin
Kevrob
2007-01-13 02:37:15 UTC
Permalink
Kevrob wrote:

> Kurt should Tuckerize....

......him. Tuckerize HIM!

The stench of finger-wagging librarian/schoolteacher is so thick in my
nostrils that I misremembered the author's sex. When I was of the age
to read those, a male in either role was an aberration.

Kevin
mike weber
2007-01-14 01:46:44 UTC
Permalink
On 12 Jan 2007 18:37:15 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> wrote:

>Kevrob wrote:
>
>> Kurt should Tuckerize....
>
>......him. Tuckerize HIM!
>
>The stench of finger-wagging librarian/schoolteacher is so thick in my
>nostrils that I misremembered the author's sex. When I was of the age
>to read those, a male in either role was an aberration.
>

Someone with the same name (i think) was some sort of Wheel in the
State Department back along about the same time.

Same person (if i'm remebering correctly)?

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-13 02:54:02 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-12 18:31:27 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:

> I read the "Homer Prices" as a kid, but I've long had McCloskey under
> investigation for "crimes against sensawunda." See the second story in
> "Homer Price," where a Kirk Alyn/George Reeves-manque visits
> Centerburg. The whole "sensible boys and girls don't enjoy silly
> stories about strange visitors from another planet" bit left a bad
> impression on this fanboy. Kurt should Tuckerize her in a Superman
> story, and inflict something suitably vile on her.

Which her?

Superduperman, Homer, or Robert McCloskey?

In any case, if I set out to pillory everyone who wrote something from
a position of ignorance -- or even thoughht superhero comics were dumb
back in the 1940s -- I'd have little time for anything else. I like
McCloskey enormously; one misfire ain't going to change that.

kdb
Kip Williams
2007-01-13 03:12:09 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:
> On 2007-01-12 18:31:27 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:
>
>> I read the "Homer Prices" as a kid, but I've long had McCloskey under
>> investigation for "crimes against sensawunda." See the second story in
>> "Homer Price," where a Kirk Alyn/George Reeves-manque visits
>> Centerburg. The whole "sensible boys and girls don't enjoy silly
>> stories about strange visitors from another planet" bit left a bad
>> impression on this fanboy. Kurt should Tuckerize her in a Superman
>> story, and inflict something suitably vile on her.
>
> Which her?
>
> Superduperman, Homer, or Robert McCloskey?
>
> In any case, if I set out to pillory everyone who wrote something from a
> position of ignorance -- or even thoughht superhero comics were dumb
> back in the 1940s -- I'd have little time for anything else. I like
> McCloskey enormously; one misfire ain't going to change that.

Indeed, it wasn't just comics; it was a whole industry. It might have
seemed less like sensawunda than just like mass entertainment.

And I wouldn't say that the creator of Ever So Much More So or the
unstoppable doughnut machine was a wonder killer.

Kip W
Kevrob
2007-01-13 06:43:47 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:
> On 2007-01-12 18:31:27 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:
>
> > I read the "Homer Prices" as a kid, but I've long had McCloskey under
> > investigation for "crimes against sensawunda." See the second story in
> > "Homer Price," where a Kirk Alyn/George Reeves-manque visits
> > Centerburg. The whole "sensible boys and girls don't enjoy silly
> > stories about strange visitors from another planet" bit left a bad
> > impression on this fanboy. Kurt should Tuckerize her in a Superman
> > story, and inflict something suitably vile on her.
>
> Which her?
>
> Superduperman, Homer, or Robert McCloskey?
>

I meant McCloskey. My Fanboy Rage made me mix up the author's sex.

> In any case, if I set out to pillory everyone who wrote something from
> a position of ignorance -- or even thoughht superhero comics were dumb
> back in the 1940s -- I'd have little time for anything else. I like
> McCloskey enormously; one misfire ain't going to change that.
>

I've calmed down about it, so I guess you are right. Maybe the way to
go would be to have Supes save "Centerburg" from some awful fate.

Kevin
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-13 07:18:10 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-12 22:43:47 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:

> I've calmed down about it, so I guess you are right. Maybe the way to
> go would be to have Supes save "Centerburg" from some awful fate.

I can't see what that would accomplish. McCloskey's dead, and neither
his work nor reactions to it are going to be altered by anything that
appears in a Superman comic.

I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
beating up guys named Wertham, either.

kdb
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2007-01-13 07:46:59 UTC
Permalink
In article <2007011223181016807-***@busiekcomics>,
Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics> wrote:
>
>
>On 2007-01-12 22:43:47 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:
>
>> I've calmed down about it, so I guess you are right. Maybe the way to
>> go would be to have Supes save "Centerburg" from some awful fate.
>
>I can't see what that would accomplish. McCloskey's dead, and neither
>his work nor reactions to it are going to be altered by anything that
>appears in a Superman comic.
>
>I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
>beating up guys named Wertham, either.
>
>kdb
>
>

Has anyone ever established any specific books that Clark/Superman
has read?


Ted
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-13 08:18:10 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-12 23:46:59 -0800, ***@loft.tnolan.com (Ted Nolan <tednolan>) said:

> In article <2007011223181016807-***@busiekcomics>,
> Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics> wrote:
>>
>> On 2007-01-12 22:43:47 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:
>>
>>> I've calmed down about it, so I guess you are right. Maybe the way to
>>> go would be to have Supes save "Centerburg" from some awful fate.
>>
>> I can't see what that would accomplish. McCloskey's dead, and neither
>> his work nor reactions to it are going to be altered by anything that
>> appears in a Superman comic.
>>
>> I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
>> beating up guys named Wertham, either.
>
> Has anyone ever established any specific books that Clark/Superman
> has read?

Sure. In a recent issue, we showed him reading JENNIFER GOVERNMENT by
Max Barry. A few issues later, he was reading a fictional John
Sandford novel.

kdb
Mike Schilling
2007-01-13 15:41:43 UTC
Permalink
"Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
news:2007011300181075249-***@busiekcomics...
> On 2007-01-12 23:46:59 -0800, ***@loft.tnolan.com (Ted Nolan <tednolan>)
> said:
>
>>
>> Has anyone ever established any specific books that Clark/Superman
>> has read?
>
> Sure. In a recent issue, we showed him reading JENNIFER GOVERNMENT by Max
> Barry. A few issues later, he was reading a fictional John Sandford
> novel.

No Nietzsche or George Bernard Shaw?
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-13 17:18:34 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-13 07:41:43 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
<***@hotmail.com> said:

>
> "Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
> news:2007011300181075249-***@busiekcomics...
>> On 2007-01-12 23:46:59 -0800, ***@loft.tnolan.com (Ted Nolan <tednolan>) said:
>>
>>>
>>> Has anyone ever established any specific books that Clark/Superman
>>> has read?
>>
>> Sure. In a recent issue, we showed him reading JENNIFER GOVERNMENT by
>> Max Barry. A few issues later, he was reading a fictional John
>> Sandford novel.
>
> No Nietzsche or George Bernard Shaw?

I don't know that it's never been shown. I haven't seen it, though.

For the most part, he's been shown to read Dickens and Austen and such,
in an effort to portray him as "nerdy." I think if that's all we see,
it doesn't come off as nerdy so much as ancient. So I've tried to show
him reading stuff written during his purported lifetime as well.

I also had him reading a nonexistent Dennis Etchison novel, in one scene.

kdb
Kip Williams
2007-01-13 17:49:26 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:
> On 2007-01-13 07:41:43 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
> <***@hotmail.com> said:
>
>> "Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
>> news:2007011300181075249-***@busiekcomics...
>>
>>> On 2007-01-12 23:46:59 -0800, ***@loft.tnolan.com (Ted Nolan
>>> <tednolan>) said:
>>>
>>>> Has anyone ever established any specific books that Clark/Superman
>>>> has read?
>>>
>>> Sure. In a recent issue, we showed him reading JENNIFER GOVERNMENT
>>> by Max Barry. A few issues later, he was reading a fictional John
>>> Sandford novel.
>>
>> No Nietzsche or George Bernard Shaw?
>
> I don't know that it's never been shown. I haven't seen it, though.
>
> For the most part, he's been shown to read Dickens and Austen and such,
> in an effort to portray him as "nerdy." I think if that's all we see,
> it doesn't come off as nerdy so much as ancient. So I've tried to show
> him reading stuff written during his purported lifetime as well.
>
> I also had him reading a nonexistent Dennis Etchison novel, in one scene.

Using his ex-libris vision, no doubt.

Kip W
Michael S. Schiffer
2007-01-13 23:57:56 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics> wrote in
news:2007011309183416807-***@busiekcomics:

> On 2007-01-13 07:41:43 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
><***@hotmail.com> said:

>> "Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
>> news:2007011300181075249-***@busiekcomics...
>>> On 2007-01-12 23:46:59 -0800, ***@loft.tnolan.com (Ted Nolan
>>> <tednolan>) said:

>>>> Has anyone ever established any specific books that
>>>> Clark/Superman has read?

>>> Sure. In a recent issue, we showed him reading JENNIFER
>>> GOVERNMENT by Max Barry. A few issues later, he was reading a
>>> fictional John Sandford novel.

>> No Nietzsche or George Bernard Shaw?

> I don't know that it's never been shown. I haven't seen it,
> though.

Nietzsche shows up in Elliot S. Maggin's _Last Son of Krypton_
novel, along with other writers on Superman's (albeit a different
version of Superman than Kurt is writing) early reading list:

***
For a long time it was very difficult for Clark to notice when
someone was trying hard. Most of what was important to American
men in the twentieth century—surviving, prevailing, creating—came
easily to Clark. All he ever needed was a good start. He had
picked up the English language in a matter of weeks. He seemed to
skip right over the single word stage and whole sentences poured
from his infant lips. Grammatical rules did not much interest him
at first, although his mind was frighteningly sharp. He often came
out with statements like, "Me want finish reading _Tale of Two
Cities_," and then he did precisely that.

The Kents decided early that at least for awhile they were going to
screen his influences very carefully. Martha Kent held, for
example, that stories of cutthroats and street urchins of the type
Dickens wrote were not the sort of things Clark should be exposed
to. She put the Bible and lots of Horatio Alger on his reading
list. If he were going to insist on reading, she thought, it might
as well be decent material. Land sakes, he can wait for _Tom
Sawyer_ until he's assigned it in school.

By the time Clark Kent was old enough to start the first grade he
had been exposed to the wisdom amassed over ten thousand years of
human history on Earth. He was even able to extrapolate a bit on
that wisdom. He could have discoursed with Descartes and Locke.
In an apparent contradiction of his own condition, he held Hobbes
and Nietzsche and their ideas of the natural superiority of certain
members of society, in contempt. Martha Kent appreciated the
influence of her reading list, but she suggested that he substitute
simple rejection for the contempt.
***
<http://superman.ws/thebook/lsok/?chapter=11>

Mike
Keith F. Lynch
2007-01-13 18:30:22 UTC
Permalink
Ted Nolan <tednolan> <tednolan> wrote:
> Has anyone ever established any specific books that Clark/Superman
> has read?

Can he read all of them at once with his x-ray vision?
--
Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.
mike weber
2007-01-14 01:50:17 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 23:18:10 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics>
wrote:

>I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
>beating up guys named Wertham, either.

Wertham reprints a crime-comic cover shwoing what he claims (and i
agree certainly looks like) a caricature of himself bound and gagged.

\And then there was Will Eisner's "Awful Book" story (which he, for
some unaccountable reason, rewrote extensively for reprint, taking a
lot of the humour out, in my opinion, featuring "...Dr Wolfgang Worry,
school psychiatrist, holding his weekly book-burning..."

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Kip Williams
2007-01-14 02:40:21 UTC
Permalink
mike weber wrote:
> On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 23:18:10 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics>
> wrote:
>
>>I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
>>beating up guys named Wertham, either.
>
> Wertham reprints a crime-comic cover shwoing what he claims (and i
> agree certainly looks like) a caricature of himself bound and gagged.
>
> \And then there was Will Eisner's "Awful Book" story (which he, for
> some unaccountable reason, rewrote extensively for reprint, taking a
> lot of the humour out, in my opinion, featuring "...Dr Wolfgang Worry,
> school psychiatrist, holding his weekly book-burning..."

MAD did a great article, "Baseball Is Ruining Our Kids" by Frederic
Werthless, M.D., illustrated by Wood. It jumped to some remarkable
conclusions.

I did one or two swipes at Doc Wertham, "The Man of Cheese," in the 70s.
Imagine my surprise, decades later, to learn that the Cherman accent I
stuck him with was actually true to life.

Gordon Garb met him at a con, during the mid-70s period the doc was
investigating fandom (he gave it good marks), and he gave Gordon a short
verse with his autograph, which Gordon pubbed in his zine.

Kip W
Kevrob
2007-01-14 20:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Kip Williams wrote:
> mike weber wrote:
> > On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 23:18:10 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics>
> > wrote:
> >
> >>I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
> >>beating up guys named Wertham, either.
> >
> > Wertham reprints a crime-comic cover shwoing what he claims (and i
> > agree certainly looks like) a caricature of himself bound and gagged.
> >
> > \And then there was Will Eisner's "Awful Book" story (which he, for
> > some unaccountable reason, rewrote extensively for reprint, taking a
> > lot of the humour out, in my opinion, featuring "...Dr Wolfgang Worry,
> > school psychiatrist, holding his weekly book-burning..."
>
> MAD did a great article, "Baseball Is Ruining Our Kids" by Frederic
> Werthless, M.D., illustrated by Wood. It jumped to some remarkable
> conclusions.
>
> I did one or two swipes at Doc Wertham, "The Man of Cheese," in the 70s.
> Imagine my surprise, decades later, to learn that the Cherman accent I
> stuck him with was actually true to life.
>

I always thought the best revenge on Doc W was the underground horror
comic, "Dr Wirtham's Comix and Stories."

> Gordon Garb met him at a con, during the mid-70s period the doc was
> investigating fandom (he gave it good marks), and he gave Gordon a short
> verse with his autograph, which Gordon pubbed in his zine.
>
>

Dwight Decker published an article about Wertham, and how he brought
fanzines and fandom to his attention. See:
http://art-bin.com/art/awertham.html

As grumpy as I might have once gotten about this fellow who was a
nemesis of one of my favorite pasttimes, he did good work fighting for
racial equality and against the death penalty.

Kevin
mike weber
2007-01-14 21:13:32 UTC
Permalink
On 14 Jan 2007 12:53:01 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> wrote:

>
>I always thought the best revenge on Doc W was the underground horror
>comic, "Dr Wirtham's Comix and Stories."

I'd forgotten that one.

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Kip Williams
2007-01-14 22:18:11 UTC
Permalink
Kevrob wrote:
> Kip Williams wrote:
>
>>I did one or two swipes at Doc Wertham, "The Man of Cheese," in the 70s.
>>Imagine my surprise, decades later, to learn that the Cherman accent I
>>stuck him with was actually true to life.
>
> I always thought the best revenge on Doc W was the underground horror
> comic, "Dr Wirtham's Comix and Stories."

I've known about that for several decades, but have no recollection of
ever reading it.

> As grumpy as I might have once gotten about this fellow who was a
> nemesis of one of my favorite pasttimes, he did good work fighting for
> racial equality and against the death penalty.

Well, nobody's perfectly awful. He wrote an earlier book that I read,
_The Show of Violence_, that had an interesting chapter where he refused
to sensationalize a patient and was subsequently cut out of future
dealings with the attorneys. It was a very short chapter.

He certainly didn't make that mistake again with _Seduction of the
Innocent_. I've long thought he decided on that one when sales of his
earlier books began to level off, and he needed another lurid hook to
get some better numbers.

Kip W
John
2007-01-14 23:58:48 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 23:18:10 -0800, Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics>
wrote:

>On 2007-01-12 22:43:47 -0800, "Kevrob" <***@my-deja.com> said:
>
>> I've calmed down about it, so I guess you are right. Maybe the way to
>> go would be to have Supes save "Centerburg" from some awful fate.
>
>I can't see what that would accomplish. McCloskey's dead, and neither
>his work nor reactions to it are going to be altered by anything that
>appears in a Superman comic.
>
>I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
>beating up guys named Wertham, either.


Huh, I didn't even know that you've been writing Superman. I've never
been a big fan of Supes, but I guess I'll take a look. (Would really
like to see more Arrowsmith...)


--
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-15 00:07:58 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-14 15:58:48 -0800, John <***@newsgroup.please.com> said:

> Huh, I didn't even know that you've been writing Superman. I've never
> been a big fan of Supes, but I guess I'll take a look. (Would really
> like to see more Arrowsmith...)

More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.

Hope you like SUPERMAN, when you give it a look.

kdb
Mike Schilling
2007-01-15 03:30:27 UTC
Permalink
"Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
news:200701141607588930-***@busiekcomics...
> On 2007-01-14 15:58:48 -0800, John <***@newsgroup.please.com> said:
>
>> Huh, I didn't even know that you've been writing Superman. I've never
>> been a big fan of Supes, but I guess I'll take a look. (Would really
>> like to see more Arrowsmith...)
>
> More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.

Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
Kurt Busiek
2007-01-15 03:48:03 UTC
Permalink
On 2007-01-14 19:30:27 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
<***@hotmail.com> said:

>
> "Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
> news:200701141607588930-***@busiekcomics...
>> On 2007-01-14 15:58:48 -0800, John <***@newsgroup.please.com> said:
>>
>>> Huh, I didn't even know that you've been writing Superman. I've never
>>> been a big fan of Supes, but I guess I'll take a look. (Would really
>>> like to see more Arrowsmith...)
>>
>> More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.
>
> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?

We're hoping to avoid that, but I do have a shovel...

kdb
Kip Williams
2007-01-15 14:40:41 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek wrote:
> On 2007-01-14 19:30:27 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
> <***@hotmail.com> said:
>
>> "Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
>> news:200701141607588930-***@busiekcomics...
>>
>>> On 2007-01-14 15:58:48 -0800, John <***@newsgroup.please.com> said:
>>>
>>>> Huh, I didn't even know that you've been writing Superman. I've never
>>>> been a big fan of Supes, but I guess I'll take a look. (Would really
>>>> like to see more Arrowsmith...)
>>>
>>> More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.
>>
>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>
> We're hoping to avoid that, but I do have a shovel...

What, he didn't survive and a double was buried? He didn't live on in
another dimension? He didn't have an android duplicate built? His brain
waves weren't recorded and put into a clone? He didn't go to the
dimension of Death and play a great game of puff billiards and get
released? He didn't get time travelled just before death and end up in
our Now? He didn't get taken into, oh, some bottled city? He didn't get
accidentally duplicated by an otherwise unliving quantity of rock? He
wasn't a vampire? His death wasn't a dream, an imaginary story? He
wasn't reconstructed by a really clever alien?

Man, comics have changed.

Kip W
Mike Schilling
2007-01-15 15:55:43 UTC
Permalink
"Kip Williams" <***@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:***@comcast.com...
> Kurt Busiek wrote:
>> On 2007-01-14 19:30:27 -0800, "Mike Schilling"
>> <***@hotmail.com> said:
>>
>>> "Kurt Busiek" <***@busiek.comics> wrote in message
>>> news:200701141607588930-***@busiekcomics...
>>>
>>>> On 2007-01-14 15:58:48 -0800, John <***@newsgroup.please.com> said:
>>>>
>>>>> Huh, I didn't even know that you've been writing Superman. I've never
>>>>> been a big fan of Supes, but I guess I'll take a look. (Would really
>>>>> like to see more Arrowsmith...)
>>>>
>>>> More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.
>>>
>>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>>
>> We're hoping to avoid that, but I do have a shovel...
>
> What, he didn't survive and a double was buried? He didn't live on in
> another dimension? He didn't have an android duplicate built? His brain
> waves weren't recorded and put into a clone? He didn't go to the dimension
> of Death and play a great game of puff billiards and get released? He
> didn't get time travelled just before death and end up in our Now? He
> didn't get taken into, oh, some bottled city? He didn't get accidentally
> duplicated by an otherwise unliving quantity of rock? He wasn't a vampire?
> His death wasn't a dream, an imaginary story? He wasn't reconstructed by a
> really clever alien?

A mad scientist turned him into a supervillain, but a lucky accident turned
him back into the faithful butl..., umm, novelist, he'd been before.
Keith F. Lynch
2007-01-15 21:07:52 UTC
Permalink
Mike Schilling <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> "Mike Schilling" <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?

> A mad scientist turned him into a supervillain, but a lucky accident
> turned him back into the faithful butl..., umm, novelist, he'd been
> before.

It can't happen here.
--
Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.
Kevrob
2007-01-15 22:48:40 UTC
Permalink
Keith F. Lynch wrote:
> Mike Schilling <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >>> "Mike Schilling" <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >>>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>
> > A mad scientist turned him into a supervillain, but a lucky accident
> > turned him back into the faithful butl..., umm, novelist, he'd been
> > before.
>
> It can't happen here.
>

Maybe Grant Morrison hid him on Cloud 9.

Kevin
mike weber
2007-01-15 23:26:20 UTC
Permalink
On 15 Jan 2007 16:07:52 -0500, "Keith F. Lynch" <***@KeithLynch.net>
wrote:

>Mike Schilling <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>> "Mike Schilling" <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>
>> A mad scientist turned him into a supervillain, but a lucky accident
>> turned him back into the faithful butl..., umm, novelist, he'd been
>> before.
>
>It can't happen here.

Who could imagine thatt they would freak out somewhere in the
suiburbs?

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
Mike Schilling
2007-01-15 23:38:33 UTC
Permalink
"Keith F. Lynch" <***@KeithLynch.net> wrote in message
news:eogqf8$8k0$***@panix2.panix.com...
> Mike Schilling <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>> "Mike Schilling" <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>
>> A mad scientist turned him into a supervillain, but a lucky accident
>> turned him back into the faithful butl..., umm, novelist, he'd been
>> before.
>
> It can't happen here.

Except on Main Street.
Kip Williams
2007-01-16 00:24:20 UTC
Permalink
Mike Schilling wrote:
> "Keith F. Lynch" <***@KeithLynch.net> wrote in message
> news:eogqf8$8k0$***@panix2.panix.com...
>
>>Mike Schilling <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>>>>"Mike Schilling" <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>>
>>>A mad scientist turned him into a supervillain, but a lucky accident
>>>turned him back into the faithful butl..., umm, novelist, he'd been
>>>before.
>>
>>It can't happen here.
>
> Except on Main Street.

Biographical note: I was named for my grandfather, whose last name (I
kid you not) was Babbitt.

Kip W
William December Starr
2007-02-04 15:59:38 UTC
Permalink
In article <2007011419480327544-***@busiekcomics>,
Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics> said:

> <***@hotmail.com> said:

>>> More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.
>>
>> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
>
> We're hoping to avoid that, but I do have a shovel...

And you're only one skull short of a Mouseketeer reunion.

--
William December Starr <***@panix.com>
Default User
2007-02-04 17:58:56 UTC
Permalink
William December Starr wrote:

> In article <2007011419480327544-***@busiekcomics>,
> Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics> said:
>
> > <***@hotmail.com> said:
>
> >>> More ARROWSMITH will materialize someday.
> > >
> >> Won't you have to dig up Sinclair Lewis for that?
> >
> > We're hoping to avoid that, but I do have a shovel...
>
> And you're only one skull short of a Mouseketeer reunion.

Now no one will be able to say you don't own John Larroquette's spine.



Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
Mark Atwood
2007-01-15 02:19:38 UTC
Permalink
Kurt Busiek <***@busiek.comics> writes:
>
> I can't see a reason to do anything about it. I don't have Superman
> beating up guys named Wertham, either.

Wrong context anyway. Superman is the wrong guy to do it.

The *Punisher* should beat Wertham to halfway to death, kick him over
to DC Vertigo, have the Specter finish him off, then have him come to
the negative attention of Lucifer, who in a fit of ironic amusement,
gives him to Morpheus as a plaything of Cain and Able.

--
Mark Atwood When you do things right, people won't be sure
***@mark.atwood.name you've done anything at all.
http://mark.atwood.name/ http://fallenpegasus.livejournal.com/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2007-01-13 04:56:02 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups.com>,
Kevrob <***@my-deja.com> wrote:
>
>
>Kip Williams wrote:
>> Michael Stemper wrote:
>> > I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
>> > Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
>> > such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
>> > Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?
>>
>> It was the sheriff. (Doughnut machine query answered elsewhere already.)
>>
>> > If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>>
>> They are still amusing and full of clever details.
>>
>>
>
>I read the "Homer Prices" as a kid, but I've long had McCloskey under
>investigation for "crimes against sensawunda." See the second story in
>"Homer Price," where a Kirk Alyn/George Reeves-manque visits
>Centerburg. The whole "sensible boys and girls don't enjoy silly
>stories about strange visitors from another planet" bit left a bad
>impression on this fanboy. Kurt should Tuckerize her in a Superman
>story, and inflict something suitably vile on her.
>
>Kevin
>

Huh. I thought they were borderline SF in some cases. The donut
machine certainly seemed as marvelous as anything Tom Swift
came up with (Ok, not anything, but as marvelous as a "giant
searchlight" anyway!). Besides Homer Price was apparently named after
the first fantasy author whose name we know.


Ted
Kip Williams
2007-01-13 05:06:12 UTC
Permalink
Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
> In article <***@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups.com>,
> Kevrob <***@my-deja.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>Kip Williams wrote:
>>
>>>Michael Stemper wrote:
>>>
>>>>I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
>>>>Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
>>>>such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
>>>>Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?
>>>
>>>It was the sheriff. (Doughnut machine query answered elsewhere already.)
>>>
>>>>If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>>>
>>>They are still amusing and full of clever details.
>>
>>I read the "Homer Prices" as a kid, but I've long had McCloskey under
>>investigation for "crimes against sensawunda." See the second story in
>>"Homer Price," where a Kirk Alyn/George Reeves-manque visits
>>Centerburg. The whole "sensible boys and girls don't enjoy silly
>>stories about strange visitors from another planet" bit left a bad
>>impression on this fanboy. Kurt should Tuckerize her in a Superman
>>story, and inflict something suitably vile on her.
>
> Huh. I thought they were borderline SF in some cases. The donut
> machine certainly seemed as marvelous as anything Tom Swift
> came up with (Ok, not anything, but as marvelous as a "giant
> searchlight" anyway!). Besides Homer Price was apparently named after
> the first fantasy author whose name we know.

On a slight tangent, the Super Duper story nowadays causes me to think
of the opening sequence of Chris Ware's book of _Jimmy Corrigan_, where
he meets the super guy at a publicity event. Super Guy talks his way
into coming back with them, sleeps with Jimmy's mom, and slips quietly
out of the house in the morning. (The alert reader can peruse the paper
record for evidence of whether Ware is averse to the sensawunda.)

Kip W
Joseph T Major
2007-01-13 02:30:20 UTC
Permalink
"Kip Williams" <***@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:***@comcast.com...
> Michael Stemper wrote:
>> I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
>> Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
>> such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
>> Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?
>
> It was the sheriff. (Doughnut machine query answered elsewhere already.)
>
>> If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>
> They are still amusing and full of clever details.

I liked the one about the Old Mansion outside of town, which had its
surrounding property turned into a development, with all the houses being
copies of the original house. (Charles Addams did a series of drawings on
that theme, with a plain-box colonial house being turned into a Victorian
Gothic monstronsity, then being redeveloped back to the original
configuration). Then the owner decides to replace the old house with one of
the prefab copies, because it "doesn't fit".

This bothers everyone, because they have been finding their homes by
reference to the old house. So they're finally going to put up street
signs. The old house gets moved, everyone goes to a social, and when they
leave, they find that . . .

. . . the guy who was supposed to put up the street signs got drunk and lost
the map, so no one knows how to find his, hers, or their way home. Much
hilarity ensues.


Then there was as someone mentioned the giant ragweed (or "WAGREED!" as
the sheriff called it -- he was allergic, too).

Or the time "The Super-Duper" came to town. Homer and his friends just
loved the Super-Duper serials at the movies, and when he himself drove into
town, and then on the way out, into a ditch . . .

Joseph T Major
--
"Punch, brothers, punch!"
mike weber
2007-01-14 01:45:14 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 21:30:20 -0500, "Joseph T Major"
<***@iglou.com> wrote:

> Or the time "The Super-Duper" came to town. Homer and his friends just
>loved the Super-Duper serials at the movies, and when he himself drove into
>town, and then on the way out, into a ditch . . .

Never liked that one; it took a fairly snooty attitude toward comic
book heroes (and/or their derivatives.)

--
mike weber (***@gmail.com)
============================
My Website: http://electronictiger.com
===================================
No use looking for the answers when the questions are in doubt - Fred leBlanc, "The Love of My Life"
William December Starr
2007-02-04 16:15:02 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@comcast.com>,
Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:

>> If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>
> They are still amusing and full of clever details.

Was it "Homer Price" that had a story about a parent/child baseball
game or somesuch in which all of the mothers "hilariously" had no clue
whatsoever as to the rules of the game? I remember finding that one
utterly absurd as I was essentially raised by, and learned all about
baseball from, my mother and (maternal) grandmother, both of whom
were strong Mets fans. (And before that, Brooklyn Dodgers fans.
Never, *ever* say the name "Bobby Thomson" in my mother's presence.)

--
William December Starr <***@panix.com>
Mike Schilling
2007-02-04 16:52:24 UTC
Permalink
"William December Starr" <***@panix.com> wrote in message
news:eq50q6$bbt$***@panix2.panix.com...

>
> Was it "Homer Price" that had a story about a parent/child baseball
> game or somesuch in which all of the mothers "hilariously" had no clue
> whatsoever as to the rules of the game? I remember finding that one
> utterly absurd as I was essentially raised by, and learned all about
> baseball from, my mother and (maternal) grandmother, both of whom
> were strong Mets fans. (And before that, Brooklyn Dodgers fans.
> Never, *ever* say the name "Bobby Thomson" in my mother's presence.)

http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/exhibits/online_exhibits/1951/sounds/thomson_sound.mp3
Kip Williams
2007-02-04 17:20:42 UTC
Permalink
William December Starr wrote:
> In article <***@comcast.com>,
> Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:
>
>
>>>If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?
>>
>>They are still amusing and full of clever details.
>
>
> Was it "Homer Price" that had a story about a parent/child baseball
> game or somesuch in which all of the mothers "hilariously" had no clue
> whatsoever as to the rules of the game?

A page-by-page survey of the complete adventures reveals nothing
resembling this description.

Kip W
William December Starr
2007-02-04 17:56:13 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@comcast.com>,
Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:

> A page-by-page survey of the complete adventures reveals nothing
> resembling this description.

Hrmp. I know the story I encountered was in a similar setting --
small-town middle America, 1940s/50s -- and was written somewhat
like the Homer Price stories. (Oh gods, could it have been in one
of the Katie John books?)

--
William December Starr <***@panix.com>
Kip Williams
2007-02-04 18:56:25 UTC
Permalink
William December Starr wrote:
> In article <***@comcast.com>,
> Kip Williams <***@comcast.net> said:
>
>>A page-by-page survey of the complete adventures reveals nothing
>>resembling this description.
>
> Hrmp. I know the story I encountered was in a similar setting --
> small-town middle America, 1940s/50s -- and was written somewhat
> like the Homer Price stories. (Oh gods, could it have been in one
> of the Katie John books?)

I never thought of Katie John as being like Homer Price. I'll look into
it some day, if it's convenient.

Kip W
John
2007-01-14 23:31:31 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 16:31:38 -0600, ***@siemens-emis.com (Michael
Stemper) wrote:

>In article <***@amsu.fallenpegasus.com>, Mark Atwood writes:
>
>>Some books I really enjoyed as a kid were the books about Homer Price,
>
>I think that you've just answered a question for me. Did the Homer
>Price series include a town barber who did (unintentional) spoonerisms,
>such as always answering the phone "Sarber Bhop"? Did one of the
>Homer Price books have a doughnut machine as the McGuffin?

Yep and Yep.

>If so, how do the Homer Price books read as an adult?

I've re-read them after digging them up from the basement for my kids,
and I liked 'em just fine.


--
Loading...